Experience

 
 
 
 
 
2018 – Present
New Jersey

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Princeton University

 
 
 
 
 
2014 – 2017
Pennsylvania

Graduate Research Assistant

The Pennsylvania State University

 
 
 
 
 
2013 – 2014
Maryland

Visiting Studient

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Lab

 
 
 
 
 
2012 – 2013
Pennsylvania

Graduate Research Assistant

The Pennsylvania State University

 
 
 
 
 
2010 – 2012
Pennsylvania

Undergraduate Research Assistant

The Pennsylvania State University

Selected Publications

Secular tidal trends are present in many tide gauge records, but their causes are often unclear. This study examines trends in tides over the last century in the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. Statistical models show negative M2 amplitude trends at the mouths of both bays, while some upstream locations have insignificant or positive trends. To determine whether sea level rise is responsible for these trends, we include a term for mean sea level in the statistical models and compare the results with predictions from numerical and analytical models. The observed and predicted sensitivities of M2 amplitude and phase to mean sea level are similar, although the numerical model amplitude is less sensitive to sea level. The sensitivity occurs as a result of strengthening and shifting of the amphidromic system in the Chesapeake Bay and decreasing frictional effects and increasing convergence in the Delaware Bay. After accounting for the effect of sea level, significant negative background M2 and S2 amplitude trends are present; these trends may be related to other factors such as dredging, tide gauge errors, or river discharge. Projected changes in tidal amplitudes due to sea level rise over the 21st century are substantial in some areas, but depend significantly on modeling assumptions.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 2017

The response of salinity in the Delaware Estuary to climatic variations is determined using statistical models and long-term (1950-present) records of salinity from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory. The statistical models include non-parametric terms and are robust against autocorrelated and heteroscedastic errors. After using the models to adjust for the influence of streamflow and seasonal effects on salinity, several locations in the estuary show significant upward trends in salinity. Insignificant trends are found at locations that are normally upstream of the salt front. The models indicate a positive correlation between rising sea levels and increasing residual salinity, with salinity rising from 2.5 to 4.4 per meter of sea-level rise. These results are consistent with results from 1D and dynamical models. Wind stress also appears to play some role in driving salinity variations, consistent with its effect on vertical mixing and Ekman transport between the estuary and the ocean. The results suggest that continued sea-level rise in the future will cause salinity to increase regardless of any change in streamflow.
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 2015

Recent Publications

Secular tidal trends are present in many tide gauge records, but their causes are often unclear. This study examines trends in tides …

Through a case study of Hurricane Arthur (2014), the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean …

The response of salinity in the Delaware Estuary to climatic variations is determined using statistical models and long-term …

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